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Edwardian?? Jacket

Discussion in 'PUBLIC Vintage Fashion - Ask Questions Get Answers' started by jauntyrooster, Aug 23, 2011.

  1. jauntyrooster

    jauntyrooster Alumni

    Was thinking that this is Edwardian? Haven't handled much this early so was hoping for confirmation.

    Was it normal to have all that boning in the underjacket (is there a better name?)?

    Thanks all!!!!
    Maureen

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  2. Agree with Edwardian - someone can date it more thoroughly but I'd put it about 1900, maybe a little earlier. All the boning etc is not uncommon in this style of bodice (rather than jacket).

    Nicole
     
  3. jauntyrooster

    jauntyrooster Alumni

    Thank you Nicole. So would they have still worn a corset under this. That would be misery!
     
  4. vertugarde

    vertugarde Alumni

    As a Member of the VFG I'd like to encourage you Maureen and all the Friends who post on this Forum to really take some time to learn about the history of fashion and in particular from 1800 onwards. In addition to the wealth of information that is available today from books, museum collections, online etc., Friends should also go to the VFG Resource Links on the Main Site. Please look through the valuable research provided by Members. You will find Fashion Timelines and the VFG Lingerie Guide very useful Maureen;

    http://vintagefashionguild.org/fashion-timeline

    To answer your question, a corset would normally have been worn under this bodice.

    http://vintagefashionguild.org/lingerie-guide/
     
  5. jauntyrooster

    jauntyrooster Alumni

    I actually do quite a bit of research...both online and through books I have purchased. I have had few pieces this early so get nervous and just like some reassurance with my dating. I am sorry if this was crossing a line for you. I won't ask again.
     
  6. vertugarde

    vertugarde Alumni

    Maureen, this certainly wasn't posted with any objective other than to encourage Friends to access the VFG Resources. We remind Friends from time to time about the many Resources the VFG offers. Your question was valid and welcome. I wanted to make my suggestion inclusive to the Friends who come to this Forum and the many others who visit the VFG website and learn from posts such as yours. I look forward to reading your future posts.
     
  7. jauntyrooster

    jauntyrooster Alumni

    It would take quite a bit to get me post another question. It was through reasearch that I came up with Edwardian dating and was only asking for confirmation. I am aware of vfg resources and use them frequently. It has long been a goal of mine to be a member here. Your insinuation that I need to learn how to research and better use resources is upsetting and embarassing to me. I try to use this resource sparingly and have been so grateful for help here. This is mortifying to me so I will probably not risk feeling this way again.

    Thank you to everyone for all the help you have given me...if I have not said it enough, I appreciate all of you and this resource.
     
  8. Linn

    Linn Super Moderator Staff Member

    Maureen,

    I hope you will not stop asking questions - or posting. I always enjoy your posts and contributions and hope that you will atttain your goal of becoming a VFG member in the future.

    Your questions are always well thought-out, your photos clear, and your desire to know and learn apparent. I know much more about 20C. fashion than earlier and would definitely have had to ask for confirmation on the date if I'd found this piece, myself.

    I'm looking forward to seeing more from "The Trunk" and answering any questions that you may have about any of them- if I know the answer!
     
  9. vertugarde

    vertugarde Alumni

    I strongly encourage you to continue posting.
     
  10. Pinkcoke

    Pinkcoke Alumni

    MrsGrossmyer you shouldn't be put off from posting again, -emotions and people's way of saying things to one another don't communicate the same way online as in real life face to face and in my experience you regularly have to remind yourself that a message can be read many different ways.
    I have only been here myself for a matter of months and though I do post frequently, like yourself I research online and with the books I can get hold of to further my own knowledge, coming here when I run out of ideas or need clarifcation or perhaps specialist knowledge from somebody with more experience in an area than me.
    Please don't think you aren't wanted here because without newer members a forum can't grow and obtain new material from places further away. Each member is a benefit to the group.
    I hope you will come back to read this and know you can feel you can post again.
     
  11. jauntyrooster

    jauntyrooster Alumni

    Thank you Linn - I appreciate your kind words - they mean a lot to me.
     
  12. jauntyrooster

    jauntyrooster Alumni

    Thank you Pinkcoke - I appreciate.
     
  13. peaceful vintage

    peaceful vintage Administrator Staff Member

    Maureen, I admire you responding honestly and sharing how you felt. Keep posting. As long as the VFG will have me and help me learn I will be here. You should be here too. ;)

    Writing sometimes comes off so different than it is intended.

    Caryn
     
  14. poppysvintageclothing

    poppysvintageclothing Administrator Staff Member

    Maureen, please do continue posting here when you are uncertain of an item. We do enjoy seeing your finds and helping you out when we can.

    We all are learning about something new almost every day here, and quite often from items that our friends bring to our attention.

    Honestly, it's difficult to know it all when it comes to antique and vintage garments as there are always surprises!

    This is a lovely bodice, I think I still have one similar to yours, hiding in a trunk here somewhere!
     
  15. bycin

    bycin Guest

    vertugarde, I appreciate a reminder as you posted but it could've been under a separate thread so as not to single out anyone? I like how people ask and learn. It helps build community. Singling out - as it appeared - doesn't though I know you meant the best for the community.
     
  16. crinolinegirl

    crinolinegirl Alumni

    I didn't read vertugarde's post as singling out anyone, just a friendly head's up to anyone who doesn't know about it that we have a bunch of more useful links to help dating too for people doing research on an item. Some of them I didn't know about and I've been here since 2003! :)

    The problem with the internet is that you can't give inflections on what you type so sometimes things come off as being harsher than what they were intended.

    Thank goodness for smilies :USETHUMBUP:

    On a side note, a corset was ALWAYS worn unless you were some of rational dress person but even then, you would have worn some sort of soft corded Ferris Good Sense Waist for bust support. It's like going braless today, you just don't do it (well, not me anyways- it would be obscene!) so the Victorians and Edwardians thought the same about corsets :)

    A common mistake is that people think that the boning in the bodice IS the corset but it's not. The boning was there to give the bodice shape and to smooth out any fat bulges created by the corset. Like a corset for the corset.

    Lei
     
  17. sarah-jane

    sarah-jane VFG Member

    A corset's corset. What joy.

    Don't be mortified or upset Maureen and, most importantly, don't go! I was hoping you'd be joining up soon...

    Sarah
     
  18. jauntyrooster

    jauntyrooster Alumni

    Lei - Thank you so much for addressing my issue about the corset. I was quite specifically asking whether or not they would have worn an additional boned item underneath this already boned item. Your lovely response provided me with a great learning experience and I appreciate.

    Sarah - thank you for your kind words.

    For anyone who thinks that I am overreacting to this, I would just ask that you put yourself in my shoes and ponder receiving a response like vertugarde's in a public and professional forum of your peers (friend or member). She clearly implied that I need to take the time the learn about fashion history (as if I had done nothing for the past 2 years) and that I needed to learn how to use resources to research (as if I just run right here all the time and do nothing on my own). I just ask you to think about how you would feel if this was directed at you in an open forum such as this.

    I will say no more on this topic unless someone requests my input. Thank you all, you have been very kind - on this thread and in the past. Your group truly has an amazing membership base. I will continue to enjoy reading and learning here but, I just cannot risk another situation like this so will refrain, at least for time being, from posting questions.
     
  19. mingus107

    mingus107 Registered Guest

    Maureen, I know nothing of the fashions from this time period, so I can only say- it's GORGEOUS! You have been scoring some serious finds, you lucky girl!
     
  20. Jonathan

    Jonathan VFG Member

    I think your bodice is a bit later, but its matronly, so it's a little 'old fashioned'. The full sleeves with the deep cuffs look c. 1906-08ish to me, however, I did see an exhibition once of various items that were salvaged as flotsam and jetsam after the Titanic sinking, and a bodice almost identical to this was found inside a suitcase, so it was still being worn as late as 1912! Ideally, the boning is to keep the bodice's shape, not yours, so it was intended to be worn with a corset. It's not like a corset - it's like boning in a brassier. The corset was not a tool of torture - it was only the vain who pulled the strings too tight that give us that impression. It's like today's shoes - I have yet to actually see any woman walking down the street in a pair of Louboutins with 6 inch heels and 3 inch platforms. I only see them being worn by young, vain women, for special events. Most of us wear shoes most of the time for style, protection, and comfort, not style, style, and style.
     

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