Vintage Jewelry Workshop - Part II

Discussion in 'Vintage Jewelry 2010 by Linn' started by Linn, Oct 19, 2010.

  1. Linn

    Linn Trade Member

    The predominant jewelry style at the turn of the 20th C. is called Edwardian, after King Edward VII (1901-1910) who assumed the throne in England, after the death of his mother Queen Victoria. This style began about 1890 and extends to 1914 – the beginning of WWI. This Period is called La Belle Époque in France. It encompasses various Arts Movements, including Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, Les Fauves and the Wiener Werkstätte in Austria.

    It was a period of both great social rigidity and great social change. Changes included the status of women, including the issue of women’s suffrage, increased economic opportunities as a result of rapid industrialization and many changes brought about by the First World War.

    Jewelry fashions of the day were influenced by Princess Alexandra, (later Queen Alexandra) shown here wearing a diamond and pearl "dog collar."

    [​IMG]

    The type and style of jewelry worn is often determined by the fashions of the day. We will spend a little bit of time talking about what women were wearing in the periods we are discussing. There is an excellent Fashion Timeline on the VFG website which covers each period in far more depth - with examples of garments from 1800 – 1960’s. http://vintagefashionguild.org/fashion-timeline/

    The 1890's began with a return to the heavily corseted hourglass shape of the early Victorian period. Slightly prior to the turn of the century a new type of “health” corset was invented - supposedly to give women more freedom - which forced them into an "S" curve. In the late 1890’s the silhouette slimmed and elongated. Blouses and dresses were full in front and puffed into the "pigeon breast" shape of the early 20th century that looked over the narrow waist, which sloped from back to front and was often accented with a sash or belt. Necklines were supported by very high boned collars. Pins were worn at the collar, and sash pins or fancy buckles were worn at the waist. This is the era of the Gibson Girl.

    Here are some examples of Edwardian pins - both fine and costume:

    This piece is fine jewelry but is a good example of the style of the Edwardian period:

    [​IMG]

    This one is costume:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This early Cosmopolitan cover shows the Edwardian woman:
    [​IMG]

    This is an early Celluloid Arts and Craft's Brooch:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    An early 20.C Belt Buckle with Art Nouveau motifs:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    From "The Delineator" - 1901
    [​IMG]

    Around 1908, the Paris fashion houses began to show a new silhouette, with a thicker waist, flatter bust, and narrower hips. By the end of the decade the most fashionable skirts cleared the floor and approached the ankle. The overall silhouette narrowed and straightened, beginning a trend that would continue into the years leading up to the First World War.

    During the early part of the 20C., both fine and costume jewelry was predominately small scale and "white." Pearls and diamonds were set in delicate platinum and white gold filigree. Lavaliers and delicate small gold pins worn at the collar were popular. Costume jewelry followed suit in non-precious metals and imitation gemstones. As the new century progressed jewelry was influenced not only by designers such as Poiret and Chanel but by the costumes of the Ballet Russes, "contemporary" art and design.

    Fashion Designs by Paul Poiret Illustrated by Paul Iribe - 1908
    [​IMG]

    From the Jeweler's Circular - 1912
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Changes in dress during World War I were dictated more by necessity than fashion. As more and more women were forced to work, they demanded clothes that were better suited to their new activities, and shirtwaists and tailored suits were worn.

    We looked at this pin in Part I. It is sterling set with paste stones, C. 1915-1920.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    The Post WWI Woman no longer wanted to be confined and corseted. She cut her hair and wore looser, more colorful clothing which by the mid-1920's became knee length. Rather than accenting the female shape of the previous eras, the female figure became flat and boyish. The flapper was born - and this style gave rise to jewelry which showed off bobbed hair and the dropped waistline. In addition to long earrings, multiple bracelets and knee length necklaces, called sautoirs, women wore jeweled headbands or feathered aigrets and carried small beaded or jewel encrusted bags.

    Early 1920's:

    [​IMG]

    The jewelry in the early 1920's continued the pearl and diamond look of the Edwardian period but the middle part was all about color and outside influences - Egyptian, Oriental, Indian, African, etc. Art and Architecture played a large role.

    The discovery of King Tut's tomb in 1923 led to a renewed interest in all things Egyptian. Here's a Cartier ad and a period costume bracelet :

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    In 1925, the Paris Exposition des Arts Décoratifs et Industrielles Moderne was held. The exhibition was scheduled to be held years earlier but was postponed because of WWI. This exhibit introduced The Art Deco style (1910-1939) to the world. The term Art Deco was not coined until the very late 1960's - however the Style predominated until the start of WWII, influencing fashion, architecture, transportation – trains, planes, boats, automobiles, household appliances, furniture and jewelry!

    1926:
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    1920's costume pieces:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Fishel Nessler:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Crystal and Peking Glass beaded sautoir:
    [​IMG]

    In 1926 it was "all the rage" to wear multiple bracelets:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Diamonbar:

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Alco:

    [​IMG]

    1920's Napier "Slave" bracelet:

    [​IMG]

    Unsigned Brass and "Faux" Lapis Slave Bracelet:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    1928:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]


    Another major influence on jewelry in the late 1920's that lasted well into the '30's and '40's was the multi-colored carved gemstones - rubies, sapphires and emeralds brought back from India by Cartier. These pieces were nicknamed “Tutti Fruitti” and later called “Fruit Salad” in costume jewelry. Trifari made many costume pieces using imitation carved glass stones in the late '30's.

    Here's a 1928 piece by Cartier from the Royal Magazin website:

    [​IMG]

    C. 1920's Costume Pieces:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    These earrings have a patent for the mechanism dated 1927. They are a great example of "stream-lined Art Deco."

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    During the 1920's new materials such as Bakelite were used in costume jewelry. Bakelite jewelry was particularly popular in the '30's-'40's. Here's a sautoir made of Bakelite with rhinestone "rhondelles" and some other pieces of late 1920's costume jewelry:


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    In Part III we will discuss the 1930's, streamlined Art Deco, dress clips and "convertible" dress clips.
     
  2. cactusandcattails

    cactusandcattails Super Moderator Staff Member

    Linn, this is such a wonderful history of the period! I know I will be referring to this and the other parts of the jewelry workshop many, many times.

    A fantastic resource you have given us!
     
  3. The Vintage Merchant

    The Vintage Merchant Administrator Staff Member

    omgoodness, Linn! what a fabulous collection of information...i must come back when i have more time to really soak it up! thanks so much for this presentation!!
     
  4. Linn

    Linn Trade Member

    Thank you, Brenda!

    I really enjoyed putting it together. I hope we have lots of participation and questions - which I will try to answer!

    Linn
     
  5. Linn

    Linn Trade Member

    Thanks, Mary -

    Linn
     
  6. thespectrum

    thespectrum Administrator Staff Member

    Linn, this is great! I particularly like the *slave bracelets*
     
  7. glamoursurf

    glamoursurf Registered Guest

    Linn,

    I have learned so much from the first two sessions and I am looking forward to more of what you have to present. Your pictures and photography skills are stunning and your knowledge of jewelry is amazing. Bravo and thank you!
     
  8. joules

    joules Trade Member

    Breathtaking presentation, Linn. Thank you for this fabulous workshop with all of us.

    I have a question. On the second Edwardian example above, what would the non-precious metal typically used have been, in these sorts of pins, lavalieres, etc.? What would you say it is, in the pictured example pin?
     
  9. Linn

    Linn Trade Member

    Julie -

    I think the metal on that pin is brass or an alloy with a high brass content. There were lots of gold plated pieces in this time period and rolled gold pieces, too. Sterling silver was used. There was also a lower karat gold - 9K. and 10K. And like today, base metals were plated or gold or silver plating - so were "goldtone or silvertone." So to answer your question lavalieres could have been done in many different metals.

    There are a number of jewelry catalogs on the Jewel Chat site. Here's a link to one of them:

    http://www.morninggloryantiques.com/JewelChatBecken02.html

    There is a wealth of information on this site - including an article showing turn of the century ladies - their jewelry and their fashions. Here's a link to Jewel Chat:

    http://www.morninggloryantiques.com/JewelChat.htm

    Linn
     
  10. cactusandcattails

    cactusandcattails Super Moderator Staff Member

    I have another mystery piece Linn.

    I bought this several years ago from a member. It was not expensive or anything, I just like the design. I assumed it was a belt buckle, but the mechanics and findings dont really make sense as a belt buckle.

    As you can see it has an old tube style hinge but also has two small rings on each end, that I assume something would attach there.


    As far as date, would you say this is early 20th century?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. poppysvintageclothing

    poppysvintageclothing Administrator Staff Member

  12. Linn

    Linn Trade Member

    It's great! I think it is a "decorative" belt buckle meant to be sewn on to a fabric belt through the rings and then maybe tie in the back - or attach with snaps or hooks.

    It doesn't look like this opens and closes so I doesn't have a tube hinge. A tube hinge has a pin stem attached in the center that moves and allows the pin to open and close. This reminds me of a little piece of pipe tubing that is secured at both ends. Probably not the correct terminology - :0

    I think it is C. 1930's. It reminds me a little bit of this pin.

    [​IMG]

    I can see your piece on a 1930's black rayon crepe dress. I could be totally wrong and if so I hope someone will chime in with their idea of what it is!

    Linn
     
  13. poppysvintageclothing

    poppysvintageclothing Administrator Staff Member

    It looks very art deco to me as well, Brenda.

    I had a dress I sold not that long ago that had a similar piece, circa 1930. There was one attached as a buckle and then it had another piece on the shoulder of the dress. It was a sleeveless gown.
     
  14. cactusandcattails

    cactusandcattails Super Moderator Staff Member

    Oh that makes sense! To sew it on.

    The hook piece (dont know the proper term) for the buckle actually does move on the hinge. You can move it all the way from one side of the opening to the other, if thats what you mean by open and close.

    At any rate I have worn it several times with a neat black 30s dress I have and just pinning to a black belt. Will post a pic one day!
     
  15. Linn

    Linn Trade Member

    Brenda -

    I couldn't tell from your photo that anything moved. I thought the metal "rod" holding the hook was stationery. Could you show the other side where it opens and show it open - if it's not too much trouble.

    If you look back at Part I of the Workshop one of the first photos shows a gold Victorian brooch with a tube hinge. The pinstem is in the center and it moves up and down and is secured by the "C" catch.

    Love to see a photo of the '30's black dress with the buckle! (And you wearing it!)

    Linn
     
  16. cmpollack

    cmpollack Trade Member

    Another fabulous presentation! Such eye candy... Many thanks for this great resource, Linn.

    I especially love seeing your early pieces with colored stones (like the second pin), as I am so used to thinking of Edwardian period jewelry as exclusively "white". (How big is that second pin, BTW?)

    And I have a mystery piece to contribute, though you'll have to forgive me if it doesn't fit the timeline of today's workshop at all! Sometimes I think this piece is late 19th C, sometimes I think maybe it's 30s/40s... I'm really all over the place.

    It appears to be a pendant, but the bail (and frame) seem unusual, with the bail loop very small in diameter.

    Doesn't test as bakelite, and it's about 1 1/2" in height.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Any clue?
     
  17. cactusandcattails

    cactusandcattails Super Moderator Staff Member

    Sure Linn.Here it is open to both sides and a closeup of where the hinge attaches at the back.

    This is why I thought it might possibly be a bit older. Next time I dress up and use this piece, I will post a pic!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Linn

    Linn Trade Member

    Carrie -

    The second pin is 2 5/8" x about 1/2". I am assuming that I have it dated correctly. I think it's a bar pin and would have been worn at the collar of a blouse or shirtwaist. A friend of mine gave it to me ages ago - when I still lived in Boston and had not started collecting. It was her aunt's. I don't know more about it - so it could be later.

    I know almost nothing about cameos. I have read that one clue for dating them is to look at the features of the figure and the hairstyle and based on that - and this is a "wild" guess I am guessing that it might fit into today's time frame. She looks sort of C. 1910 - influenced by the costumes for the Ballet Russes and by Poiret. The hair is kind of wild and sort of reminds me Diagolov's staging of "L'Après Midi d'un Faun" - sort of.

    You will probably get a much more "reasoned" answer on JC or by looking at one of the antique sites that specializes in cameos. I don't have any cameos and can't help beyond this - sorry! There may be some people on the VFG forum who know more about this subject. Have you looked on Jewel Chat?

    Linn
     
  19. cmpollack

    cmpollack Trade Member

    Thanks for the info on the bar pin--I thought it looked bigger! I tend to get confused with bar pins vs lace pins (ie the smaller ones!), though maybe the two terms are interchangeable and just range in size?

    Re the cameo--I think your wild guess sounds very well-reasoned! I have looked at many cameos to compare. I think the fact that it's made of a mystery substance complicates things!

    I'll post on JC and see what folks think there...
     
  20. Linn

    Linn Trade Member

    Brenda -

    I see what you mean. Does the buckle pull away from the hinge by pulling the lever out from the hinge at one end? I think I see a little "thingy" to pull. Does it come out completely? It may be older.

    Carrie - hope someone knows the answer on your cameo.

    I will be out for a few hours but please keep asking questions and if anyone knows the answers please post them!

    Linn
     

Share This Page