Customer Service: Or How to Get the Most out of your Holiday Shopping Season for Buyers and Sellers.

Discussion in 'Customer Service 2004 by PatentLeatherShoes' started by Patentleathershoes, Nov 7, 2004.

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  1. TheVintagePeddler

    TheVintagePeddler Registered Guest

    If I have not heard back from a buyer in 3 days I will send this:

    Hello,
    I have not heard back from you in regards to this auction(s). Please reply as soon as possible.

    Ralph Lauren WOOL TWEED Skirt Sz 8 Like New (eBay Item #5334175026) - Qty: 1 Price: 28.00

    (along with a copy of all the info that was on the invoice)

    After 5 days I send this:

    (with "yoohoo" in the subject line)

    Hello,
    I am baffled as to why I haven't heard back from you in regards to this auction. Something I said? Is it me? I hope all is well with you. Please do drop me a line so I know where we are on this. Thanks so much!

    Please reply as soon as possible.

    Vintage 60's LUXE Tweed Jacket WHITE FOX COLLAR MINT (eBay Item #8129151841) - Qty: 1 Price: 109.00

    (again I include all info)

    This works well for me. It is light and no accusitory and almost alway gets a response.

    Marie
     
  2. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    I have a lot of other things I will be covering, but at any time, anyone is welcome to jump in if you have a questions/situation/example/different view to bring up. If you plan to throw a rotten vegetable, just give us all fair warning.... : )
     
  3. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    Thanks for sharing that Marie and I crossposted with you!
     
  4. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    I think the yoohoo one really catches them off guard. Do people usually just end up paying immediately, or do they write back apologetically?? Just asking out of curiousity
     
  5. I like the Yoo Hoo idea. I usually just put SECOND NOTICE in the subject line but this sounds better.

    Usually if I have not heard from someone on the second day, I will forward them my first email saying to them..

    Hello I emailed you yesterday concerning you being winning bidder for this auction. I have not heard from you so maybe you did not receive or have overlooked. Please refer to shipping and payment info below. Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Chris, when you have time maybe you could discuss newsletters to customers. I think Marie does one. Is there any software for this purpose or a way your customers can sign up for a newsletter? Just thinking of putting pics of my current auctions with a link to them. Maybe wishing them Happy Holidays or something.
     
  6. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    Linda, that's an effective note.

    Know why?

    I read that message real quick and thought Holy Mackerel! my email must be screwing up and I forgot to pay Linda! But then I read it again and said to myself "oh yeah, the auction i wanted to bid on isn't over yet" Phew!

    Newsletters/auction updates..

    that is a great subject. I have been actually doing one of two things, and I think I could use a little polish here.

    I have a newsletter. I set up a yahoo group where only I can post messages, and I send updates out. That way, people can subscribe and unsubscribe when they want, and it has the potential of picking up some people that are surfing the net and my list of offerings interests them.

    I am considering switching to an automated one though. Marie may know the name of a site you can use, but some folks just use their own email software as long as you copy all the names in the Bcc: line so they don't see eachother, but this sometimes has the danger of being caught up in a spam filter...

    The second thing I have started to do is in a card file next to my desk, I keep a list of requests. I had a cute suit up that a few people emailed me and said "that's really cute, but do you have anything in my size?" or they buy it and want more similar. I keep track of their name/email address/likes and when I get something in I send them a personal note via email. I invite people to join the list, too, but people like the personal service. If i have someone who is a regular customer and something I think that might suit them comes in, I may drop them a friendly note to say.

    "Hi So-and-So,

    I just had a purple and green polka dotted purse that just came in. I think it will match that yellow striped bell palazzo pants just perfectly and thought of you the minute I found it. I wasn't sure if you were around, but wanted to give you a heads up. Email me if you would like me to send the direct link to the auction when I get ready to list"

    This way you get a response from them.

    OR

    "I just listed it and here is the link to the auction....or watch for it this weekend..." etc.

    If you go through your list once a week or so it will keep things fresh.

    Many high class establishments do personal shopping services. This is your way to do it. It may sound time consuming, but with things so impersonal on the internet, this lets people know that you are a real person behind the screen, and make them "Your vintage clothing/Accessory
    person on the 'net". Just knowing that you are "looking out for them" is a good feeling.

    I am sure you could search heaven and earth for something, but there is a salesperson or a shop that sticks out in your mind that might always be able to find something that will do for what you are looking for. Instead of going to every shop in the world, you tell them "i am looking for such and such" and inevitably, you get a call in the days or coming weeks.

    I got a note from an ebay seller i had forgotten about. I bought a hat from them and that is not their usual merchandise, but I got a note saying "We have a few more hats in that we will be listing saturday...we thought you might like to know!" and i did!

    ======================

    Now lets talk about formatting a newsletter and the difference between an "auction notice" and a "newsletter"....
     
  7. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    The Auction Update and the Newsletter

    An auction update is a friendly note sent to a list of people to let them know about your auctions.

    What you have to decide is are people going to subscribe voluntarily, request to be put on the list, or are you just going to send it.

    If you really think a past customer would like something, I would go with the personal note. And like Marie, if it is not a one time shot or personally directed at the customer, I would ask permission to add them to the list, either directly ("Would you like me to put you on my update list so you will know when another Flying Purple People Eater comes up at auction") or indirect ("If you are pleased with my service and like the type of items I select for my customers, you can subsribe to my update list by doing this...") That is a matter of personal style. The first one does require a direct response, however.

    If you are doing an automated auction update, make sure you use some type of "branding" or otherwise use your store name, and remind people who you are. Don't just send a

    "Hi! Here's what i got up. Thanks, Bob"

    because people will forget they signed up and won't know who you are.

    Another great thing to do to make your updates and newsletters effective is to offer some sort of "perk"...either a "members special"

    That could be anything from a repeat customer discount, to know what you will be listing before it goes to auction, etc...whatever you decide.

    What shifts something from being an "update" to a "newsletter" is offering something besides just "check my auctions!"

    Maybe it is that, but a "tip of the week" about caring for vintage, a little personal story on a particular item -- like a showcase. ..."this handbag may look unassuming, but it has quite a history. It was owned by a head of a local newspaper who led a whirlwind life..." or other "inside details" you might not always divulge in a listing, or you may want to continue more of the story. Or even comments about how this fits into current trends. It doesn't have to be a long article, just something to read and catch their interest.
    Something that benefits or interests them that is more than just a sales pitch.



    Here is one format that I have used...


    Your store Update - November 3, 2004
    ========================================
    Specials!

    It's shoe week! We are bringing out all the beautiful shoes we have saved just for you. Check out the new store merchandise all this week to be the first to pick from the new selection

    http://yourstoresurl


    10% off for list members on all socks this week.
    (If you win, please email and let us know that you are a list
    member, as we don't know everyone's ebay id and we will invoice you
    with the discount!)

    ========================================
    ENDS TODAY!

    Vintage lot of old breakfast cereal
    httP ; /// auction link

    Hermes Kelly Bag
    http://


    and so on and so forth.


    ============================
    Newly Listed! I added a lot of Buy It Nows this week,
    So check them out before they disappear

    (and list the links to your brand new auctions



    =============================
    Coming up ...we are currently working on

    A few more vintage handbags
    a Very unusual vintage dress
    more books
    More prints,
    some more WWII items in
    and just more!

    Now here list all your links - store, ebay, etc..
    =====================================

    Thanks you for your business, it is most appreciated!

    My name!!
    ======================================


    So you have offered reminders on what is ending, what is current, and things to look forward to.

    Any other ideas or styles anyone else has...please share, but this is one of them.

    To up the anti to make this more newsletter-ish.....Plug in just a little more info....
    Share a few of your favorites links with people (i told people about the shoe workshop last time), are there any shows you will be selling at so people can meet you?, Did you have an unusual item this week and you learned something interesting about it? Share it! It's your service and taste that they want more of of.
     
  8. Chris, really good ideas!! Tip of the Week..I like that.

    Thought about doing a Yahoo Photo page but last time I did one, the email did not get sent.

    I have had good luck with PhotoBucket, though. Had a customer who wanted to see all my nurse's uniforms. Sent him 32 pictures!

    I actually use an index card system. Every auction I have is placed on a card with measurements, auction number, day ended , price, buyers Ebay ID and email address. It would be easy to go back and list all the email addresses that way.

    However, I have not set up a card file for special requests. That is a very good suggestion.

    Did I scare you into thinking you hadn't paid me? LOL. It hasn't ended yet! :D
     
  9. TheVintagePeddler

    TheVintagePeddler Registered Guest

    I use ConstantContact.com to do my Sneak Peeks Newsletter.
    If anyone wants me to send them a copy of one of my past ones just drop me an email.


    Marie
     
  10. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    Linda, I don't put pictures in it, just links to the auction or to my mall store. It would be cool if I did....but that way, it encourages them to click and look. (and not all people have html enabled email or they turn the preferences off and I forget that sometimes not everyone has the fastest running processors). That way, also, they click into my store or ebay and I can measure how effective it is. Even if they don't bid, I can see if they looked with my traffic report. It will say that they were referred from clicking within their email or if they came right from the web group.

    In MLS, the realtor software system, you can chose the pictures/listings and then send it in a clickable link and a custom webpage is generated showing everything you want to show them, and i kind of liked that idea, but it is not really as practical unless each month i make a html page and put it on my server etc...and i want them to check all of my things too.

    The FAQ/ABOUT ME Info pages of your webpages/store can be used somewhat for this purpose. i do see people have upcoming auctions on them, and you can go a step further by adding a blurb about when they will be up.
     
  11. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    Marie, I think I will check that out!

    And a word about photo services/servers.

    Yahoo pictures will cancel out your account of pull your photos if they are hosted there and used for ebay, so be careful when doing more with it than sending it to an individual or person to person. I have no idea if they allow folks to use it for yahoo auctions, but I assume they are cracking down on commercial use.

    If you are out there using yahoo or even photobucket, have a back up even a low priced minimal plan from a paid service. I always try to look at my bottom line, but free services don't have as much of an obligation to get things working again when they are down. That could be important during the busy season when people are "on a mission". If you notice the free service is down, you can always edit and have the photo sources coming from the other server. Or better yet, use the paid service or your own server over the holidays if you have a lot of auctions. I am sure that the additional volume for the retailing season will affect the free ones more than the paid once. Don't quote me, but that is just speculation.

    This relates back to customer service in that you are giving the customer all the info that they need by having the pictues load properly, and it is also for yourself....if you can talk or email a live person that can help you fix the problem in a jiff, it might be easier than being at the whim of the wind.
     
  12. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    And another thing...

    I keep emphasizing the customer coming back to you and being "their source".

    Well, there are times that you just don't have what someone wants. It could be something that you don't specialize in, don't have an eye for, and aren't expected to acquire any time soon. You don't have the "radar for it"..etc... And then there are times when it is somethng in the realm of possibilities for you...you just know of someone who has one right now, etc.

    In otherwords, it might be advantageous to them to be referred onto someone else. And what better way to do it by not flicking them off into space with a

    "sorry charley, go buzz off elsewhere," then with a professional referral.

    Many times, when i have done this, I do not lose a customer. People have a lot of respect for people who are willing to be honest and say "I don't know", or "I don't have it, but I can tell you where to find it."

    Or, They were not my customer to begin with and people remember good service for the future.

    This is where it is good to maintain business relationships and friendships.

    Whenever I refer someone, I give them the recommended seller's site name, etc, but I also contact the seller. (and these sellers are people that have personally given me good service in any product type) I say,

    Hi so and so,

    I had an inquiry today from someone looking for vintage replacement golf shoe spikes. As you know, i am not a golfer, it is not something I general;y have the opportunity to find. I knew that you could better steer them towards what they are looking for. Their name is Gary Golfer and their email address or phone is xxxxxxx. I gave them your site with high recommendation, and just wanted to give you the heads up that he will be connecting with you."

    So, the person contacts the seller,

    "i don't see any green golf spikes on your site, will you be getting any in. "

    And then the seller can say

    "Hi Gary,
    Matilda at Miss Muffett's TuffetFarm told me that you might surf by. I don't have any, but am going to a golfers estate tomorrow and will look especially for you.... Tell Matilda I said hello."


    Okay, obviously if you know someone is well you probably won't be that formal.

    Now you are creating great relationships with your fellow/sister sellers....and they are likely to reverse the favor someday.
    It also helps to establish relationships with people that are outside the world of vintage clothing because you never know they might have something who is looking for what you have too!

    I made an inquiry with a collectors association recently (and it was sent out to a few different members) and got a few responses back. A lot said "sorry we have never heard of it" and "i don't specialize in that, so am puzzled why you asked" But one said

    "I am sorry we don't have what you are looking for. We have a website and an update list so don't despair, we might come across when yet and you can keep tabs on it if we don't get to contact you first."

    Of all of them, guess whose website i will check back too??

    Being a part of the VFG or other professional or trade organization whose members uphold standards, I can trust that even if I have not personal done business with them, i can expect to entrust a client to them and they will be taken care of properly....i can tell people to search by the acronym... But out in cyberspace, it is not always so easy to search for an acronym to find every type of seller that person could be looking for.
     
  13. pastperfect2

    pastperfect2 Trade Member

    Great Point - and I would like to emphasize that keeping a "Wanted by customers" list can be a very good thing both service and sales wise.

    Altough it's always a good idea to ask if it's a one time want, or a long term interest.

    A year ago,I finally found a volume of Shakespeare that a good friend had been hunting for at least 10 years. That was a treat.

    On the other hand , I have learned to be careful when purchasing with only one customer in mind. They may not like the item and then I am stuck with it. I don't spend anymore than I would normally, and I don't purchase items that are out of my general line.


    Hollis
     
  14. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    That's a good point too, Hollis about making sure not to be narrow in not picking up things out of your regular line. And then that is where the referral can come in if it is not something you feel you have the means to find the item or it is too oddball to what you normally carry. I could see you picking up a 1930s photo for someone in mind or a turn of the century sewing pattern that might not be clothing, but you probably would not have any problem selling it with your customer base if they decided they didn't want it, but I can hardly imagine you all the sudden offering a bobble headed doll from last year's superbowl! Or a pair of Jelly shoes.

    I am so glad that you found that book! I bet you made their year! I love stories like that.

    Also, i would like to remind buyers (and we are all buyers!) is to not be afraid to ask, too. There is no harm in asking if you like someone's merchandise or style and asking if they have items in different sizes or a related accessory. Of course vintage pieces are often unique, but you never know what a seller has and has not yet offered for sale and I am sure they would be happy to offer if they knew there was an interest or at the very least would give you a heads up when they were going to add it to their website.

    So, for obvious reasons the answer will probably be "no" if they have something in a different size, but they may have other things that might work for you as well.
     
  15. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    Okay...

    Let's talk a minute about after the transaction.

    Yes, the seller has many responsibilities in representing an item, but the buyer is an equal partner here.


    You purchased the lovely coat of your dream from a webstore. It arrives in a timely fashion.

    Scenario I

    When you open the package, there is a problem that you perceive.
    You try to button the coat and it does not fit!
    What do you do?

    First lets back up to before you start shopping and before you fall in love with something. Yes, we are talking about "flat measurements". Many sellers state:

    "Garment was measured flat. Measurements were doubled where apropriate. Please compare to similar garments that fit you".

    What does this really mean? Especially since you don't already own a 50s tulle ball gown with a crinoline skirt.

    So lets dissect and mull things over...

    Firstly, lets explain what a flat measurement is. The garment is placed on a flat surfuce, and measured acrossed the garment, instead of measuring the circumference of a garment which would be difficult without a "body" wearing it. So lets say the flat waist measurement is 15" - way too small for any adult i know to fit in! However, when you read in an item's dosier the waist measurement, it is typically already doubled for you to 30".

    Measurements that are standardly doubled are:

    Waist
    Bust
    Chest
    Hip

    Measurements that are not doubled are
    Shoulder measurement
    inseam
    Outseam
    shoulder to waist.

    The clue to look for is when it is stated "measurement is X" acrossed the back or acrossed the hip." then you know it most likely has not been doubled for you.

    Some people use the rule of thumb that you should take your physical body measurements and add betwen 2-4" in the chest or bust, 4" in the hips, 2" in the waist to find something that fits However this is not cut and dry at all. Drape, formality of the garment, and era play a big role on how loosely or tightly a garment should follow you body measurements and it also even depends on body type. A shirtwaist dress needs more movement room than princess seams with no buttons. Certain garments are meant to "skim the body", some are meant to hug the figure, and some are meant to be really loose and free. If you have some base measurements which we will discuss below you can determine how much room you would like. If a garment is supposed to be really loose and free and it is measuring the same bust measurement as a very fitted blouse you wear, then it will techncially be able to get on you, but won't have the same effect.

    The "bust" is standardly taken just below the arm holes of the garment unless otherwise specified.

    The waist is taken at natural waist where the garment "nips in"

    The hips are standardly taken at 7" below the waist line, but some people use 10". I personally take it at 7" because its at the point of the hip and not the widest point around the thighs which would be lower. On some extremely fitted dresses that are tight as a glove, a thigh measurement at the fullest point could also be included.
    This is very important to find out where a hip measurement is taken, especially on glove fitting dresses.

    Now an important point about hips...when it says "open" it means that the skirt is very full and the hip measurement of the wearer does not affect the wearing, as long as the waist measurement works. Many times, the flat measurement would be 20, 30, adnd even 40" more than the waist measurement. The only time you may see the measurement in this case if the skirt is a circle skirt or a nightgown that has a giant "sweep" to the skirt which would be a sought after feature. You might see 180 degree sweep in the description

    The best way to determine for sure is to take a few garments from your own wardrobe that flatter you and compare.

    Sometimes menswear is a little more cut and dry and you can use just your standard shirt and suit coat measurements, but keep in mind that the amount of room in a vintage jacket may be less than the more generously fitting suits of today and it may require you to take your chest measurement and the flat measurement of your favorite blazer just to give yourself an idea how more fitted a jacket will be on you as opposed to the fit you are accustomed to.

    (But guys, please jump in and elaborate if i am incorrect in anyway)

    For women, I suggest using a very fitted jacket, a fitted but not too tight pair of jeans and regular slacks, and an a line skirt. The reason why is say a -line is because they won't have any ruffles or other "architecture" that will get in the way and make measurements questionable. I say fitted therefore you will keep in check the reality of the smallest measurement you can take acrossed the bust/hips and if something measures a lfew inches more in the, it will give you an accurate indicator of what that really means as far as movement room.

    I also suggest that you measure a dress, or a blouse/shell that is spare and princess seamed. it is not skin tight, but its measurements can also give you the smallest measurement or about the measurement that would be apropriate in a flat front bodice or blouse.

    So take the measurements of bust/chest, waist, hips, shoulder to waist of these items. You may also want to measure a less fitted jacket to give you a "range".

    When shopping, do not only pay attention to the hard measurements, but also the drape.

    If you really don't have a garment that is way beyond anything you ever wore, for example, you never have owned strapless gown, you may want to go to a consignment shop, vintage shop, or the fancy dress department at a regular shop and try a few on. make sure to bring your tape measure with you.
     
  16. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    There actually may be some "trial and error" involved if you have not actually ever worn or purchased a vintage item. Sometimes things are going to technically fit, but they might not be a shape that suits your body. Sometimes, because the silhouettes may be different, you might find that vintage clothing of a particular era flatters you better than what it is out today.

    There are some silhouettes that are perennial, like the sheath or the shift, but even so, the fit might be just ever so slightly different. Or the way the arms are set.

    I couldn't understand why i could buy a sheath dress with no problems online, but when i tried those cute mod shift dresses, and if the bust measurement was right, etc, that the shoulders might be too wide and it basically to me looked like i was wearing maternity clothes. A lithe model could have made the dress look drop dead fabulous, but I at best was resembling a "sack of potatos!"

    Matters such as this would not be a "misrepresentation of the item." To avoid situations in the future, like stated above, it would be best to educate yourself, and if you have a bad time of trying to determine what shapes suit you best, ask an honest friend, or better yet, take photos of yourself in different shapes of clothing and then you may be able to tell what is most harmonious.

    Another guide is to pay attention to the benefits of each era of clothing...

    In the 70s featured narrower shoulders and arm hole measurements. If you are narrow acrossed the shoulders, you might look to some styles here.

    In the 40s and the 50s, women wore girdles and cinchers, so if your waist is tiny compared to your hip and bust more so than average, you may look into 40s suite or 50s wiggle dresses without the waist cinchers

    The 50s featured many full skirts which are very forgiving to the legs and thighs.

    And the list goes on so on and so forth...
     
  17. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    Also, sellers, reveal how you are coming about at these measurements.
    If you measure the shoulder from the seam to the seam, that would make a difference to someone. Many who are not used to thinking of clothing in these terms might consider that you are measuring from the outside of the shoulder, like if a person was standing with their arms at their side.

    You could have a section for people to refer to, but easier yet you can add little things like:

    Shoulders (measured shoulder seam to shoulder seam):
    Hips (7" below waist)

    That way there is no question. It will help the two of you (buyer and seller) speak a common language. There are people buying vintage clothing for the first time on the internet every day and just like us, they cannot read minds. At least most of us can't :)

    When you are "upfront" it also helps settle any misundertanding that could occur in the future.
     
  18. Noir*Boudoir

    Noir*Boudoir Guest

    Chris,
    I think all your measurement advice is *really* useful, thanks for writing such a full discussion. You're articulating a lot of things that I haven't totally thought out.

    I habitually ignore those statements saying 'allow at least 2" for comfort' because, lets face it, it's not 1986 and we've been wearing quite a few styles/types of garment pretty tight for a few years now.

    But the *style* of garment is so crucial. It's so much to do with learning through experience what shapes work with your body, rather than the measurements of any garment per se.

    I still make mistakes, I have to say - but it's interesting making them!

    Re: the whole newsletter thing. In theory I have an update e-mail list, but so few people have signed up lately that I've been shamefully neglectful of it... You've really made me think about what I should do - either give up on it or do it properly!!

    But I think conveying somehow that you list in a certain routine, or will always have an updated ME page, or will, simply, always have something interesting up, also compels people to come back and look.

    ::sigh:: so much to do!! To be honest, it makes me value a forum like this, where we have structures always here to say 'hey, look everyone, I'm still here and I have some clothes!'

    Lin
     
  19. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    Here are also some measurements to think about when considering a garment.

    Of course this is not a disertation on how to measure, but what to include to make the most of a listing whether on a website or ebay...or related info to a customer on the phone

    What is the point of this? It can eliminate the need for people to email a seller to make an informed buying decision, and can eliminate extra steps for buyers during the busy holiday retail season. Again, for every one person that asks you, there are 9 that surf by with a question in their minds and don't bother to ask.

    Anyone is open to adding to this list. And maybe not every garment warrants it, but if you find you are getting questions about measurements, you might just find something here you are missing


    Dresses:
    1)Shoulder to shoulder
    (across back if shoulder seams sit very high on the arm, or like a raglan sleeve where shoulder seam measurement may not be indicative of back width)
    2)Waist
    3) Shoulder to waist. If someone is short or long waisted, it could be a deal maker or breaker
    4) Hips
    5) Overall Length of dress (And here is a trick for buyers take overall measurement and subtract the shoulder to waist measurement and you have the skirt length)

    UNLESS of course you have an assymetrical hemline or a handkerchief hem, than it might be more advantageous to give a skirt "length range"

    If there is an unusually large seam allowance especially in strapless gowns, i would mention it!


    Pants:
    1)Inseam
    2)Outseam
    3) Rise
    4) Waist
    Also especially for men's pants, indicate if there is a seam allowance to be lengthened or note if there is a cuff.

    Skirts:
    1)Waist
    2)Hip
    3) length.


    Jackets and blouses:
    1) Bust or chest
    2) shoulder to shoulder seam
    3) waist
    4) bottom edge ot hip if it applies
    5) shoulder to waist on cropped styles
    6) sleeve length
    shoulder to cuff/underarm to cuff.

    Shoes:
    Length (inside)
    Width across ball of foot (inside)
    If it is a deep boot and can't get a tape measure, a piece of strong or other way to measure in there, outside measurement may suffice.

    Hats:
    Number size.
    On vintage hats or unmarked hats, also get inside circumference if you can. Esp if it is wearable
     
  20. Patentleathershoes

    Patentleathershoes Registered Guest

    Lin,

    What about actively asking people who buy from you if they would like to get updates from you? Especially the ones that you get to "chat with". I get some customers where I invoice, they pay and that's it, but sometimes in response to me givng them an invoice or a delivery confirmation they will email me and say "i am so excited about getting it!" or folks that ask you questions. It "breaks the ice". I also just pitch it at the bottom of my emails. and they can passively subscribe.

    You do a good job of "showing off" your goodies in this forum, but i bet there are people that you know from just surfing around seeing and buying that would like to know too. There are a lot of sellers who i check their sites and such regularly, but quite frankly the one week i get busy and forget, they had something i wanted! or it was already marked "sold" on their website! I didn't get there fast enough but if i would have gotten a heads up i would have been there.

    Don't discount a small number...many great things have happened with a small, but fervent group of people!.

    If you want to really know, the whole reason i have an update list is because someone *asked*...."I love your purses, do you have an update list or anyway that I could find out when you list stuff???" I started it that very day! It really gave me a wake up call that someone actually WANTED it! That was quite awhile ago.

    I had "regular listing days" but things happen...i find something great and i don't want to wait or we have a hurricane, or you may have someone throw you a surprise party.... : )
     
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