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Little Black Dress...date and...anyone heard of Carol Craig?

Discussion in 'PUBLIC Vintage Fashion - Ask Questions Get Answers' started by ehappy, Mar 23, 2007.

  1. ehappy

    ehappy Registered Guest

    Perhaps if you know this maker? I did a forum search and general search for this tag but nothing comes up. I'm thinking 50's BUT the only thing that's throwing me off is it has finished seams, not pinked. You might be able to see in the pic it has an overlaid skirt on top of a slim fitting skirt. Is there a name for that aside from tiered? Nice quality - fully lined in black satiny material, metal painted zip. Also, how do I identify the fabric?

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    Thanks!
     
  2. Jonathan

    Jonathan VFG Member

    I haven't heard of Carol Craig but the finished seams suggests to me that it was probably a higher end garment and possibly silk rather than rayon but its hard to guess on the material without handling it although it has a glow of silk in the pics which rayon doesn't have. I would be inclined to think its more likely early 60s. Those tiered skirts are popular around 1963ish
     
  3. BagDiva

    BagDiva Guest

    I think l have a Carol Craig somewhere...or l may have sold it..l think she was a british maker.
     
  4. Laura

    Laura Alumni

    If you can find some unfinished seam allowance somewhere, you can snip a little and do a burn test. It doesn't take much.

    Laura
     
  5. vintagebaubles

    vintagebaubles Administrator Staff Member

    I've heard the Carol Craig name, and/or seen something with that label, but know nothing about it. I agree with Jonathan that it "looks" like silk, though I have seen some finely textured linens from around that era that have a sheen and look like a slubbed silk. If you can't tell by the feel, try a burn test if you can find any small bit of fabric to snip.

    It is looking to me like it could be late 50s or very early 60's.
     
  6. borntoolatevintage

    borntoolatevintage Registered Guest

    I went to the RN# databasesearch and typed in Carol Craig as the company. What came up were an rn# and a WPL#.

    This information is from the RN thread on Ebay:

    "WPL numbers were issued from 1941 through 1959 under the Wool Products
    Labeling Act. WPL numbers begin at 00101 and end at 13669. All numbers issued subsequently are RN numbers.

    RN numbers were issued under the Fur Products Labeling Act from 1952
    through 1959. These numbers start at 00101 and continue to 04086. Beginning in 1959, all numbers issued are RN under the combined act and commence with 13670. The final number contained in this edition is 112208. Complete rules and regulations under the Wool Act,Fur Act, and the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act can be obtained by writing to Textile Section, Division of Enforcement, Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue. NW,Washington, D.C. 20580."



    Detail Information

    RN# issued in 1966 (this does not date your dress). It only estimates when the RN# was issued to the company. It can be used as a guide only.

    RN Type: RN
    RN Number: 20592
    Legal Name: CAROL CRAIG FASHIONS INC
    Company Name: CAROL CRAIG FASHIONS INC
    Business Type: IMPORTER,WHOLESALER,MANUFACTURING
    Address Line 1: 501 7TH AVE
    City: NEW YORK
    State Code: NY
    Zip: 10018
    Product Line:
    Issued Date: 06-AUG-1998


    Detail Information

    RN Type: WPL
    RN Number: 1734
    Legal Name: CAROL CRAIG FASHIONS INC
    Company Name: CAROL CRAIG FASHIONS INC
    Business Type: UNKNOWN
    Address Line 1: 501 7TH AVE
    City: NEW YORK
    State Code: NY
    Zip: 10018
    Product Line:
    Issued Date: 06-AUG-1998

    Is there either an RN# or WPL# label on your dress? That would help pinpoint this a bit closer for you.
     
  7. Jonathan

    Jonathan VFG Member

    Sara makes a good point -- pinked seams are also typically American so it could have been made in England and Carol Craig is listed as an importer...
     
  8. cmpollack

    cmpollack VFG Member

    I sold a Carol Craig dress and have a late 50s/early 60s jacket in my own collection (flecked tobacco raw silk with mustard and cream braid rick-rack like trim, fully lined). I don't remember the dress except that, like the jacket, it was very well made.
     
  9. ehappy

    ehappy Registered Guest

    Thanks, all for the information. I've found some pieces and the tag looks different than mine in that they say "Carol Craig New York" so I knew the New York connection.

    About that burn test - how do I do it and what will it tell me? Am I looking for a certain odor to tell me it's silk or not?

    Thanks!
     
  10. Silk typically smells like burning hair unless a blend, which will behave differently...
     
  11. ehappy

    ehappy Registered Guest

    Alrighty I burned it. Actually, it smelled like barbque and it was a bit hard to burn. It didn't like go up in flames. :) Would that make it not silk?
     
  12. hipvintage

    hipvintage Alumni

    mmmmmm.... BBQ! :drool:

    Well, if it were silk it would have burned as fast as a strand of hair and smelled just the same. No BBQ.

    Sounds like it's a blend or rayon.

    The "Burn Experts" will help you ID the BBQ smell.

    Janine
     
  13. hatfeathers

    hatfeathers VFG Member

    The burn test breaks down to two main branches, those that take off when lit and keep a flame or smolder going until they burn out the portion of fabric, and those that you light and they go out, light, go out. That would be not self-extinguishing and self extinguishing respectively.

    If yours smelled like a burnt meat and kept a flame for a good time, then you've got acrylic. Probably. You also have to look at the remnants of the burnt bit....hard black blob or hard bead, lace-like ash, black ash, tan bead...they all indicate a different thing.

    It takes a while to get the knack of burn testing. I frequently brush up by choosing a snippit on something that is labeled (new silk and old silk smell the same). You have to train your nose, so to say, to catch the funk of the smoke. Same thing with hot water testing Bakelite and Celluloid. I keep a button around of each to compare to if needed, since it's few and far between that I get the stuff.

    Handy burn tip, needle nose plyers or medical scissor-like clamps do nicely to hold your snippit. Fingers, not so much.


    Burn some pure polyester double knit sometime. Preetttyyyy.
    Jenn
     
  14. ehappy

    ehappy Registered Guest

    The remnant faded into brown when burnt and stayed stringy - still acrylic?
     
  15. hipvintage

    hipvintage Alumni

    Man, this is starting to sound like a pot luck dinner gone bad! :no:

    Did you taste the remnant? if it tastes like pork, then it's acrylic. If it tastes like burnt raspberries with a hint of mint, then you know it's rayon for sure! :USETHUMBUP:

    Janine
     
  16. hipvintage

    hipvintage Alumni

    I'm KIDDING!! ;)

    You are too new here for me to keep a straight face. It just ain't fair! :saint:

    Janine
     
  17. Laura

    Laura Alumni

    Oh, Janine, I read your post about tasting it, and I thought, "Oh no, tell her you're kidding!! She doesn't know your sense of humor!!" :hysterical:

    I'm not real good at burn tests - I can identify synthetic vs. natural, but sometimes the precise fiber escapes me - but here is more information on the burn test, including a handy flow chart and information specific to various fibers.

    Laura
     
  18. vintagebaubles

    vintagebaubles Administrator Staff Member

    I'm by no means an expert on burn testing, but I have done quite a few tests, and your fabric does not sound like it's silk, or at least not pure silk. Once you burn tested silk, it's easy to recognize again.

    I'm inclined to say you have a blend there--not sure of what. Silk/rayon, or linen/rayon. The look of your dress still seems to indicate that there is some natural fiber in there.
     
  19. ehappy

    ehappy Registered Guest

    I'm all for clinking a bead on my teeth to determine if it's glass or plastic but I'm SOOOO not eating fabric. lol. I knew you were kidding.

    :)
     
  20. ehappy

    ehappy Registered Guest

    Laura, thank you for the chart.

    I'm going to go with some type of blend. By the way, another question. When did they start placing 'hanger loops' in the shoulders to help the garment stay on the hanger?
     

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